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Friday, December 31, 2010

Ivory Coast: More Than A Test of Democracy. How About Respect For The Will of The people?

We have a bunch of Political Area Boys, from the Mugabes to the Kibakis of Africa, who think it is okay to ignore the will of the people and then use the platform of power-sharing as a means of holding on to power.

Ivory Coast: More Than A Test of Democracy. How About Respect For The Will of The people?

Tony Porter: Break Out Of Your Man Box!

“My Liberation as man is tied to your liberation as a woman.” I wish someone would sing that into the head of Congolese Militias and government troops until they stop destroying the bodies of their mothers, sisters and every girl child in eastern DRC.



Tony Porter: Break Out Of Your Man Box!

Africa Is Open For Business Not Exploitation

Africa is open for business not exploitation. Whenever I hear of an African country giving land away to China or any other nation to develop and then weigh it up against the returns, my mind fails to comprehend why we keep short-changing ourselves.

Africa Is Open For Business Not Exploitation

Monday, December 27, 2010

In Celebration: Ory Okolloh

I am always excited by people who challenge me mentally, intellectually, creatively and in all aspects of life. From individuals who are silent achievers to those, whose achievements are in public sphere because they have been recognised for their work, they get the baby inside me kicking and jumping when they talk about their passions and visions. Today, my choice of person to celebrate is Ory Okolloh, popularly known as the Kenya Pundit.


In Celebration: Ory Okolloh

Friday, December 24, 2010

In Conversation: Precious Williams

I do not think that writing a book, publishing it, and having it reviewed in the press – possibly harshly – is going to help anybody heal from childhood trauma. For example, One critic complained in her review that my memoir – in her view – was a ‘misery memoir’ and she implied that writing a memoir about enduring and overcoming childhood abuse is clichéd and has been done-to-death. Imagine how crushed and invalidated a writer would feel by that response if they’d written their memoir as an aide to healing and to find their voice! Fortunately, because I’d already done my healing in the appropriate setting (behind closed doors, in a therapist’s office) I was able to just shrug the comment off and think, “So maybe my book’s a misery memoir. And?”

In Conversation: Precious Williams

In Conversation: Precious Williams

I do not think that writing a book, publishing it, and having it reviewed in the press – possibly harshly – is going to help anybody heal from childhood trauma. For example, One critic complained in her review that my memoir – in her view – was a ‘misery memoir’ and she implied that writing a memoir about enduring and overcoming childhood abuse is clichéd and has been done-to-death. Imagine how crushed and invalidated a writer would feel by that response if they’d written their memoir as an aide to healing and to find their voice! Fortunately, because I’d already done my healing in the appropriate setting (behind closed doors, in a therapist’s office) I was able to just shrug the comment off and think, “So maybe my book’s a misery memoir. And?”

In Conversation: Precious Williams

Reading: A Window To The Soul

Still Water in A Storm is described as ‘A voluntary one-room schoolhouse. Neighbours as family. Thinking as pleasure. Expression as survival. We write, read, speak and listen. We practice compassion.’ The information on their website goes on to say, ‘We began as a grassroots alliance of Bushwick residents who needed an opportunity for safe self-expression.’

Reading: A Window To The Soul

Tuesday, December 21, 2010

The Joy of Reading: My Books of 2009/2010

These are some of the books I have enjoyed in the last year and half…some kept me up because I just had to finish reading. On Black Sisters’ Street by Chika Unigwe, The Long Song by Andrea Levy did that to me. Tail of The Blue Bird by Nii Ayikwei Parkes had me mesmerised with its language, I didn’t go to church one Sunday for I had to finish the book. Forgive me Lord! Yes, they were that good…others, made me think.

The Joy of Reading: My Books of 2009/2010

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Issues Give You Baggage

This is my opinion and mine alone, there are people, whose issues you will discover on Facebook, either by their status or their contribution to a thread/conversation. I dare say, it is downright sad to display your ignorance on the WWW Milky Way…

Issues Give You Baggage

Tuesday, December 14, 2010

Monday, December 13, 2010

Angelique Kidjo : In A Class of Her Own

Angelique Kidjo is in a class of her own. No one comes close and none compares. She more than deserves the Grammy nod, I hope she wins.

Enjoy!!!



Angelique Kidjo : In A Class of Her Own

Sunday, December 12, 2010

Urbanknit: The Art Of Bag Couture

An architect by profession, Dolapo James is no stranger to the world of designs. It started with her obsession of Ankara and other African fabric. Though, it was never a conscious decision to start a company, James is the proud owner of Urbanknit, a company she started over 6 years ago and specialises in handmade bags, scarves and accessories, using African fabrics. “For ages I have been obsessed with Ankara and the crazy variety we have in Nigeria. Ankara is so chic and the variety is unbelievable. It’s so different and unusual and I just thought, why not introduce it and try to create a fusion, where it’s not just about it being an African fabric but to be able to use it in everyday life also,” she says.

Urbanknit: The Art Of Bag Couture

Modern Day Slavery As Perpetrated by Africans Against Africans

Horror is an inadequate word to describe what I felt when after watching these videos. To think that the lady, who enslaved these young ladies would treat them the way she did is still hard to believe. To know that she is African like them hurts even more because she should know from history, this should never happen again.

Modern Day Slavery As Perpertrated by Africans Against Africans

Friday, December 10, 2010

The Other Side of Domestic Violence

We deplore and decry a man who beats a woman but what happens when it’s a woman beating a man?

The Other Side of Domestic Violence

Tuesday, December 07, 2010

Monday, December 06, 2010

Nelson Mandela: Conversations With Myself (Feature)

“One issue that deeply worried me in prison was the false image that I unwittingly projected to the outside world; of being regarded as a saint. I never was one, even on the basis of an earthly definition of a saint as a sinner who keeps on trying.”

Nelson Mandela: Conversations With Myself (Feature)

Sunday, December 05, 2010

Black Girls Rock!!

We are black women and we are proud. We are not for sale and we refuse to be cheapened by the bling or the dollar...

Black Girls Rock!!

Friday, December 03, 2010

Leah Chishugi: A Long Way From Paradise

A memoir of all memoirs…Leah Chishugi’s story is so compelling, I had to ask where she gets the strength to carry on. A formidable woman and a humanitarian at heart, I am in awe of her bravery. To survive a genocide is no joke but to watch your uncle killed in front of you and his heart chopped out of him while you watch, that is enough to send anyone to a mental institution. If I keep writing, then I am silly and don’t get it. Please, watch this video of Leah at a recent Frontline event...

Leah Chishugi: A Long Way From Paradise

My Brother’s Keeper

To love and to hold, in sickness and in health does not include, to love, hold and use you for my punch bag! Selah!

My Brother’s Keeper

Wednesday, December 01, 2010

World Aids Day: We Still Have Work To Do

We have come so far but we still have a long way to go. From Nigeria to South Africa to India, three countries with staggering statistics. I would like to believe the day will come, when more people have access to treatment and those already infected will no longer be stigmastised or live in shame...


World Aids Day: We Still Have Work To Do

Tuesday, November 30, 2010

Lisa Shannon: My One of A Kind Shero

I refuse to accept the notion that the Congo cannot be helped and this is the way it has to be. Congo’s fate is in the hands of the Congolese people…yes, we are responsible for ourselves and each nation for its citizens but now that their destiny is in full view of the international community, we as Africans, at home and in the diaspora can no longer sit back. In the words of Leymah Gbowee, it is time to ignite the spirit of Ubuntu, “I am what I am because of who we all are.” The body of the Congolese woman should not have to pay for me to have the latest ipod or fancy phone or laptop…enough is enough…

Lisa Shannon: My One of A Kind Shero

Igniting The Power of One: The Strength Of A Woman’s Voice.

In the last few days, I have been consumed by my reading and research into the plight of the Congolese women while writing my articles. At some point, I have pondered and wondered, what do I write about which has not been written? What have I got to say that has not been said. In fact, who will listen to me and who wants to hear and read about the Congo one more time? Haven’t they had an overload already? Watching the video clip below, I realised…we cannot stop talking about this until it stops...


Igniting The Power of One: The Strength Of A Woman’s Voice.

Thursday, November 25, 2010

Zainab Salbi: One of My Favourite Women In The World

Zainab Salbi speaks and the world listens. She is the founder and CEO of Women for Women International. It takes a special woman to stand up and say, enough is enough and takes action to follow through. Watch and find out why I love this lady. She is more than three times a lady in my book. “War is about silence, the silence of humanity.” You can say that again because we know she is on point!


Zainab Salbi: One of My Favourite Women In The World

Wednesday, November 24, 2010

An Assignment Most Special

“Rape is used as a tactic of war to drive fear and to humiliate women and their communities,” says the Women’s sphere blog page. What we fail to understand is that women are so powerful, their stability ensures the stability of the household and when you take that out of the home and transplant into the wider community, you end up with a healthy society. In a society where the women are sick mentally, emotionally, spiritually and intellectually, we have a sick society and nation. Hence, the DRC is currently ill because its women are ill. The question is, who will help them to heal? Who will fight for their souls?



An Assignment Most Special

When Becoming Rich Is A Political Statement

Poverty is systemic and it starts with the government. Where Africa is concerned, it started with slavery right up to colonialism...

When Becoming Rich Is A Political Statement

Tuesday, November 23, 2010

Rejection 101: Stop Grieving, Start Living!

Let me start with the fact that no one likes to be rejected but it is an inevitable life experience we all have to face at one point or another. From our career to our relationships to family and friends, it can come from the place we least expected it to the place where we had a faint idea it was possible, yet, we wanted to take a chance and see what will happen...

Rejection 101: Stop Grieving, Start Living!

Tuesday, November 16, 2010

My B*tches!

For the married ones who pass the test

I tell them, go home

Teach her how to get you from boyhood to manhood

The gay, single, commitment phobic and hopeless ones…

Some intentionally fail

So they can keep coming back

Selfish bastards


My B*tches!

Suicide Watch

If sorrow is a companion

I go to bed with suicide as my lover

Her gentle whisper of loss

Loss of hope and glory

Her silent but strong voice of conviction

Her aroma like the waft of an onion

Being peeled one layer at a time till it sinks into you



Suicide Watch

Thursday, November 11, 2010

Tiger Hills by Sarita Mandanna

Armed with a vivid imagination, Mandanna transports you to Coorg with her evocative descriptions of its landscape, filled with nature’s beauty. Her passion for Coorg shines through, and you can sense that her descriptions are rooted in the reality of the region. She does not shy away from bringing aspects of the cultures and traditions of Coorg into her writing. While there is a plethora of issues readers will pick from this story, Mandanna paints a fascinating canvas of different lives brought together by various events which are relatable as she explores the themes of love, family and relationships, the old and new world, through the European missionaries and their influence on the local people, customs and traditions, loss and the pain of discovering one’s own voice and identity in the multitude of a crowd.


Tiger Hills by Sarita Mandanna

In Conversation: Ogo Ogbata

I observed that butterflies are beautiful creatures welcomed everywhere. However, their start in life is quite slimy and ugly. Humans are like butterflies in a sense. Successful and confident people weren’t always so – they have evolved. Basically Egg-Larva-Pupa-Woman is about growth and change and hope. The successful nations of this world have all had humble beginnings. With faith and inspired action, our continent can morph into something beautiful.


In Conversation: Ogo Ogbata

Through The Gates by Nana Awere Damoah

“Be generous with your advice: live it instead,” says Nana Awere Damoah. He is putting soul back into reading with his collection of heart-warming stories laced with traditional Ghanaian proverbs...

Through The Gates by Nana Awere Damoah

Saturday, November 06, 2010

In Conversation: Shango Baku

Mustapha Matura’s adaption of Anton Chekov’s Three Sisters, remains one of my most memorable theatre night out. No ordinary feat, he transported me to the Caribbean with his eclectic characters and electrifying dialogue. Chekhov would have approved. What a fine production that was under the direction of Paulette Randal. Its 2010, and Matura, the award winning Trinidadian playwright is back with Rum and Cola.


In Conversation: Shango Baku

Friday, November 05, 2010

Bitter Leaf – Book Review

Chioma Okereke weaves a poetically evocative story, rich in texture and vivid descriptions as it is emotionally accessible and moving. If there is a fault to be found, it is the fact that it takes a while to get into the story as Okereke takes time to lay the foundation. This could put a lazy reader off but if you are a person who likes to be challenged by a book, once you get into the story, you do not want to drop it. All in all, this is a delightful and impressive debut novel...





Bitter Leaf – Book Review

New African and New African Woman Magazines: Must Have Editions

The New African is celebrating its 500th edition and what a bumper edition. With contributions from the likes of Kofi Anan, Kenneth Kaunda, Mo Ibrahim, Ellen Johnson-Sirleaf, Thabo Mebeki and John Agyekum Kufor, Ghana’s former president, you are spoilt for choice of articles to read. So imagine the honour I feel, knowing I also have a piece in this edition, an interview with Ahmed Kathrada, who spent 26 years on Robben Island with Nelson Mandela. Go get a copy...well worth it!



New African and New African Woman Magazines: Must Have Editions

Thursday, November 04, 2010

Dark Heart of The Night By Leonora Miano. Translated by Tamsin Black

Miano’s narrative leaps at you from the pages with pain as the most barbaric and callous act of ritual, which Isilo says will reunite Africa, is carried out by his soldiers, sentencing the villagers who are left powerless into an abyss of silence...

ark Heart of The Night By Leonora Miano. Translated by Tamsin Black

Wednesday, November 03, 2010

Court of Remorse: Inside The International Tribunals For Rwanda By Thierry Cruvellier and Translated by Chari Voss

This is an enthralling read that will leave you angry, remorseful and force you to question the principles of justice on national and international levels. It would also make a riveting court room drama series for television with the exception of one crucial reality; Rwanda’s story and continuous quest for justice is real. It is real life with real people whose national pain and loss is forever ingrained in world history.


Court of Remorse: Inside The International Tribunals For Rwanda By Thierry Cruvellier and Translated by Chari Voss

Monday, November 01, 2010

Migritude by Shailja Patel (A Must Read)

If words turn you on, then Migritude is a book you must read. Now, get your mind off sex, think about words challenging you and doing the Brazilian samba with your mind.

Migritude by Shailja Patel (A Must Read)

Saturday, October 30, 2010

In Conversation: Princess Nikky Onyeri (Part II) « Belinda Otas

What we are also witnessing not just in Africa, most times, women don’t step up to take care of their personal health. We take care of everybody else you in the home and our health is the last thing on the agenda. So, if we educate the men and some of the men have been the ones who detected the lumps in the women’s breast. And say, hey, there is something strange and go to the hospital...


In Conversation: Princess Nikky Onyeri (Part II) « Belinda Otas

In Conversation: Princess Nikky Onyeri (Part I) « Belinda Otas

There should be a holistic integrated approach to health. It should no longer be a single disease approach. So when you get a woman, you educate her on breast cancer, cancer of the cervix, hypertension, and diabetes. Things she is likely to deal with in life. I think that should be a better way to help the women on our continent.


In Conversation: Princess Nikky Onyeri (Part I) « Belinda Otas

Friday, October 29, 2010

We Are Stll Here

For anyone who has wondered what happened to this blog, please stay with us. We are astill here. We now blog/write at belindaotas.com and link to this website.

Thanks for all your interest, stay with us and we promise to keep it interesting.

Cheers.

Monday, October 25, 2010

In Conversation: Femi Elufowoju Jr.

In terms of theatre generally, there are people I just cannot touch. We have the Kenneth Branaghs, the Oliviers, the William Shakespeares; you can’t put my name in the same sentence. So, it won’t be about matching. I would love to say that my legacy or what’s on my epitaph or the epitaph on my tombstone will be “The man who allowed or found ability for African theatre to exist within the mainstream of British theatre and allowed it to continue. I just want the legacy of Tiata Fahodzi not to die with my departure really and there are other mini Femi’s knocking around”


In Conversation: Femi Elufowoju Jr.

Untilted By Inua Ellams – (Theatre Review)

Ellams writing is racy and laced with humour – “The charge was ridiculous, I was found guilty of ‘corrupting our traditional folk stories and using it solely for the advancement of ones own personal gain and interests.” – And is full of nuances which you can trace specifically to Nigeria and this makes Untitled very original. Emmanuel Lorien Spinelli use of African drums for sound effect truly brings the play home. And beyond the use of African, he creates the whispers and noise that you get in the forest which culminates in a deep hypnotic sound that transports you to different place in time though you are sitting in a theatre. Untitled as directed by Thierry Lawson and delivered by Ellams is an outstanding and brilliant performance full of energy and zest from a very promising voice in the world of theatre.



Untilted By Inua Ellams – (Theatre Review)

Wednesday, October 13, 2010

Beneath The Lion’s Gaze By Maaza Mengiste

Mengiste’s ability to skilfully weave emotionally delicate times during this ghastly period of Ethiopia’s existence through this work of fiction is both brilliant and overwhelmingly powerful. You are forced to feel empathy for the thousands of people who suffered during the revolution without knowing them and ask why it was allowed to happen in the first instance.

Beneath The Lion’s Gaze By Maaza Mengiste

Tuesday, October 12, 2010

The Long Song By Andrea Levy

Levy’s writing is poetic and full of imagery. She paints visual images with her words which is full of dramatic scenes that are painful and disturbing to take in. A sensitive subject to write about but she handles it with adept sensitivity that makes you wince, laugh and at the same time full of hope. For those who loved Small Island, The Long Song lives up to expectations and is a must read.

The Long Song By Andrea Levy

Monday, October 11, 2010

Nelson Mandela: The Man Behind The Myth

A new book, Conversations With Myself, about one of the most iconic figures in our lifetime and this Millennium, Nelson Mandela is out tomorrow. I cannot wait to lay my hands on it. The first book about Madiba I will ever read. His autobiography is still on my Amazon wish-list and I intend to go for the audio book instead of carrying over 400 pages about town. In the meantime, enjoy this short clip from CNN, unmasking the mask! Read on by clicking below...

Nelson Mandela: The Man Behind The Myth

In Conversation: Laila Lalami

In Secret Son, I tried to create complex characters and to write the most truthful story I could for then. Of course, truth is subjective, and it’s based on one’s perceptions and experiences. My own perceptions and experiences, growing up in Morocco, did not include camels, or deserts, or arranged marriages, so none of those things really had a place in my book.

Read on by clicking on the link below....



In Conversation: Laila Lalami

Saturday, October 09, 2010

CamerCouture: More Than A Movement.

African Decadence is about grandeur! The theme was inspired by Africa’s (less talked about but enduring) opulence. Africa is moving up and our designers are chronicling that exciting vibe through colours, patterns and intricate creations. Our continent is incredibly diverse and bubbling with talent and economic potential. In fact, Africa is the future! Read on...

CamerCouture: More Than A Movement.

Friday, October 08, 2010

My Country by Funmi Iyanda

My Country captures the stories of various Nigerians – from ordinary citizens going about their business to celebrities in unusual but natural settings to hard hitting stories of the day to day challenges. The documentary is directed by the award winning documentary filmmaker, Chris Dada.


My Country by Funmi Iyanda

The Secret Lives Of Baba Segi’s Wives By Lola Shoneyin

Narrated through the voice of Baba Segi and his wives, Shoneyin captures the essence of a riotous polygamous household from the African sensibility, specifically Nigeria with colourful characters. For a debut novel, you have to commend her ability to maintain a strong and fluid narrative with vivid descriptions and not once does the humour drop. A warm and captivating read, The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives will make you laugh out loud in public.

The Secret Lives Of Baba Segi’s Wives By Lola Shoneyin

Tuesday, October 05, 2010

In Conversation: Aminatta Forna

The Memory of Love is first and foremost a story and readers will take what they want from it. Mental health, obsessive love: these are merely themes of which there are many. I think if the book has a central idea, it is the notion of conscience as both a shared and individual responsibility...



In Conversation: Aminatta Forna

Saturday, October 02, 2010

Getting Married Is Not A Day’s Job! (Part 2)

Looks like the recession is also affecting people’s ability to walk down the aisle. Look on the bright side, at least you both know you are not in it for the money! Well, one hopes that is the case.

Getting Married Is Not A Day’s Job! (Part 2)

Nigeria @ 50: No More Excuses For Failure!

“The trouble with Nigeria is simply and squarely a failure of leadership. There is nothing basically wrong with the Nigerian character. There is nothing wrong with the Nigerian land or climate or water or air or anything else. The Nigerian problem is the unwillingness or inability of its leaders to rise to the responsibility, to the challenge of personal examples which are the hallmarks of true leadership.” My, my, my, what a diagnosis, an ailment that has lasted for decades. As to whether or not Goodluck Jonathan is the man to turn this around and help the nation heal? We have to wait and see.

Nigeria @ 50: No More Excuses For Failure!

Immigration: More Than An Inconvenient Truth, It Is One Helluva Of An Ugly Truth.

This is sad. There is no other word to describe it. If you have never been caught in the system, it is hard to understand. If you have never had a deportation order hanging over your head, it is hard to relate. Sometimes, I truly believe it is better to go back home and make a go of things. While stay in the West, when life is more miserable?

Immigration: More Than An Inconvenient Truth, It Is One Helluva Of An Ugly Truth.

Friday, September 24, 2010

Ibrahim Babangida: You Are Not Nigeria’s Joseph and You Don’t Deserve A Second Chance!

Watching this interview makes me angry. I am one to enthuse about giving people a second chance but every bone in my body says Ibrahim Badamosi Babaginda does not deserve and should not be given a second chance. Nigeria, Nigerians and the world don’t owe him and should not give him one. In fact, he owes Nigeria. Yes, the International Thief, Thief, Thief owes Nigeria and Nigerians! So, why don’t you just save all of us the time and energy and crawl back into your hole, sorry, I mean the mansion or should that be mansions, you built with the nation’s money. You sorry arse excuse for a leader/human being.

Ibrahim Babangida: You Are Not Nigeria’s Joseph and You Don’t Deserve A Second Chance!

Saturday, September 18, 2010

A Sneak Peek Into The Spring/Summer 2011 Eki Orleans Collection

For its Spring/Summer 2011 collection, Eki Orleans is not messing about.

Hazel Osunde, founder and head designer says she her inspiration for this collection in the beauty of waves. “The juxtaposition of the turbulent and calm nature of oceanic waves is represented in the beautiful turquoise patterns of the collection. The key silhouettes of the collection evoke the flowing imagery of waves heading to shore,” explains Hazel. With the waves as her inspiration, Hazel has created a collection that is sexy, stunning and breathtaking. This is going to be huge and its written all over the print and designs!! Watch this space, Eki Orleans means business!!




A Sneak Peek Into The Spring/Summer 2011 Eki Orleans Collection

Eki Orleans: A Fresh and New Outlook on African Prints and Designs

I found my inspiration in the beauty of waves. The juxtaposition of the turbulent and calm nature of oceanic waves is represented in the beautiful turquoise patterns of this collection. The key silhouettes of the collection evoke the flowing imagery of waves heading to shore. I believe that because my inspiration for the collection is based on the Ocean and its waves, I have been able to create a collection that is flattering, timeless and simply breathtaking if you don’t mind me saying so myself!


Eki Orleans: A Fresh and New Outlook on African Prints and Designs

Thursday, September 16, 2010

In Conversation: Arinze Kene

I think more plays like Estate Walls need to be programmed in theatre. British theatre has been documenting life in Britain as far as…well, a very long time ago. And to not write plays like Estate Walls would mean missing out on documenting a whole margin of people living in Britain.

In Conversation: Arinze Kene

Wednesday, September 15, 2010

In Conversation: Bunmi Koko

Bunmi Koko is here to stay. Watch this space because we are going to do big things!


In Conversation: Bunmi Koko

Tuesday, September 14, 2010

The Dangers Of A Sick Mind

A sick mind is dangerous in the hands of a man with no sense of self or respect for humanity.

The Dangers Of A Sick Mind

Monday, September 13, 2010

Win Theatre Tickets: We All Love Freebie

You don't want to miss this season of electrifying plays, with titles like Egusi Soup, Fixer and Pandora's Box, omo, you must be off-your-head to miss it :) See, the fun has started...

Win Theatre Tickets: We All Love Freebie

In Conversation: Chioma Okereke

Everything has been experienced, explored, said, done and written before but language is such a wonderful mechanism for experiencing, exploring, saying, doing and writing all those things in a way that is new every time…

Continue reading by clicking the link below...

In Conversation: Chioma Okereke

In Conversation: Chioma Okereke

Everything has been experienced, explored, said, done and written before but language is such a wonderful mechanism for experiencing, exploring, saying, doing and writing all those things in a way that is new every time…
Continue Read by clicking the link below...


In Conversation: Chioma Okereke

Saturday, September 11, 2010

9/11: The Day Pandora Walked Out of Her Box

The memory of 9/11 is a pain hat’s forever etched in the psyche of American history and society. As I write there are plans for a demonstration against the Islamic Centre near Ground Zero. On the other hand there are those who will also march in favour of it. So, I ask, when will Pandora go back into her box? When will respect and tolerance return? I sure hope it happens in my lifetime.

Continue reading by clicking on the link below...

9/11: The Day Pandora Walked Out of Her Box

Wednesday, September 08, 2010

Dear Pastor Terry Jones, Me Thinks You Are Wrong!

I am not here arguing for Islam or the extremists, against whom you want to take a stand. I am simply arguing common sense, which tells me that what you are about to do has got nothing but ‘TROUBLE’ written all over it. In my book, it just ‘ain’t’ worth the stress. Pick your battles because this is certainly one that should be beneath you, not engulf you like it has in the last few days. If I may, it is not too late to walk away and there is nothing shameful about walking away either.

Dear Pastor Terry Jones, Me Thinks You Are Wrong!

Ohio Church Vs Strippers

One heck of an interesting drama...

Ohio Church Vs Strippers

Tuesday, September 07, 2010

In Conversation: Olubunmi Ayeni

Meet Bunmi Ayeni, a woman with a passion to empower her generation. In her own words, she explains the hunger to see young people succeed at what they do as she tells us about her inaugural motivation conference, M.A.D.

Read the rest by clicking the link below.

In Conversation: Olubunmi Ayeni

New Look

The Belinda Otas blog has just had a makeover. Feel free to tell us what you think but don't forget to visit my website at Belinda Otas

Thanks always...

Belinda

Friday, September 03, 2010

Does Africa Need Broadband More Than It Needs Roads?

Does Africa Need Broadband More Than It Needs Roads?

Africa needs roads and good roads

Africa needs to be able to trade with itself before the outside world

Africa needs broadband too but first, let’s educate the uneducated or give them some form of training, why dump broadband on them with computers from ages past and say you are doing them a favour.

When trade begins to go hand in hand with the new age technology, then development is inevitable. In my humble opinion, Africa needs both, good roads and broadband but first, let’s get the physical infrastructure that will make life a little easier right and then we can invest billions into other areas of development. Start small, grow big!


Watch the video: Does Africa Need Broadband More Than It Needs Roads?

NNEKA: My Music Is Very Versatile

NNEKA: My Music Is Very Versatile

Nneka on life, music and injustice...watch the video

My Music is Very Versatile

Getting Married Is Not A Day’s Job!

Getting Married Is Not A Day’s Job!

Watch The Video...

Getting Married Is Not A Day's Job

Friday, August 20, 2010

In Conversation: Gbemisola Ikumelo

In Conversation: Gbemisola Ikumelo

I think we are achieving it. I don’t think it is something that we have achieved because as long as Faith Drama keeps going, that is something we have to keep achieving and keep re-inventing ways to make it better. I mean last year we did a really large scale production and though I did feel we achieved so many things, I do feel that there are a lot of things we could have done differently and better. It is a constant journey. For example, we have a young lady who is going off to one of the top drama schools in the country. Though when I first met her, it was more a case where she wanted to go to university and study psychology and do drama on the side but the experience of Faith Drama for her was one of self discovery. Where she found out that she wants to be an actor and she wants to perform. So yeah, I do think we are achieving that.

Read on...

In Conversation: Ashok Viswanathan

In Conversation: Ashok Viswanathan


So what we would like to do, ultimately, we don’t want the UK Jackson or Sharptons or Obamas…we want our own people, who will be measured for whom they are. While it good to have that inspiration, we must remember that we are unique and special in ourselves. That is one of the things we instil in our young mentees to aspire to be great in what they want to and aspire to become...

Keep reading....

Tuesday, August 17, 2010

Monday, August 16, 2010

For My Little Girl: You’re Not The Daugther of A Lesser God

For My Little Girl: You’re Not The Daugther of A Lesser God

Don’t ever give anyone the platform and audience

To tell you they will speak to you

As an act of favour and you let them

For you are not to be pitied

Nor are you the daughter of as lesser God

Friday, August 13, 2010

In Conversation: Lee Jasper (Part II)

In Conversation: Lee Jasper (Part II)

We are typically black in as much as we don’t do anything until our back is well and truly pressed against the wall. At the moment, we are seeping concrete into our spinal fluid. I think the consequences of that...which the recession and the economic impact will lead to huge levels of political activity in defence of community organisations, jobs and I think we are about to see a return after the brief room of the Stephen Lawrence enquiry which many people in the Black community thought was the turning point of our struggle but in reality, we are going to have to constantly fight to continue and have a constant level of vigilance campaign and awareness in order to improve things in our community. I think we are going to see an increase in political activity in our community...

In Conversation: Lee Jasper

In Conversation: Lee Jasper

In terms of the majority experience, it means to be poor, low-paid, unemployed and over qualified in general terms. 80 percent of the African and Caribbean community work in the public sector and there remaining work in the private sector and the level of private sector discrimination has remained fairly static and unchanged. We are not making the in-roads within the private sector that we ought to be making...

In Conversation: Matilda MacAttram (Part II)

In Conversation: Matilda MacAttram (Part II)

Over the last 10 years, the DNA of people from African-Caribbean communities have been constantly harvested and we are now at a stage where every single black family, living in Britain can be traced through the national criminal database. Anyone with profile on the database has the status of a criminal even though Black Britons are not aware of it, because of the way the database works, every single person from our community in this country now has the status of a criminal....

In Conversation: Matilda MacAttram

In Conversation: Matilda MacAttram

Saturday, March 13, 2010

Saturday, February 27, 2010

Friday, February 26, 2010

Monday, January 04, 2010

Moving House


Happy New Year!

This is to let you all know that I have moved home and while I aim to maintain this blog to the best of my ability, please, cross over with me to my new home.

It is new and work in progress but I am not letting that stop me from writing. I will go with the flow, write while I make the site better.

So, cross over with me into a new decade and a new website.

Thanks for taking your time to read this blog and leaving your comments. They have been very encouraging. I hope you keep reading my new blog and of course, leave your comments also.

www.belindaotas.com

Cheers!!!!